The Different Types of Editors Authors Should Know | Win's Books
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The Different Types of Editors Authors and Writers Should Know

July 9, 2021

Hi everyone! So this week and into next week, we’ll be discussing editing and WIP snippets for the Build-A-Book series! So I had a poll done on Instagram and Facebook on whether I should do a blog on different types of editors. And the astounding response was yes! When I had started writing, I had know clue that there were different kinds of editors. I wish I’d known about these editors when I first started writing and editing my works.

I hope this will help some writers and future authors on which editor(s) are best for them. So I’ve compiled a list of book editors writers should know. Disclaimer, I’m not the all-knowing being of book editing, so this list and information is based off of my own knowledge and experience.

Here are the list of different kinds of editors you can hire:

  • Beta Reader/Critique Partner
  • Proofreader
  • Developmental Editor
  • Copy/Line Editor

1. Beta Readers and Critique Partners

man in white dress shirt reading book; beta reader
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

What is a beta reader/critique partner you may ask. A beta reader reads unreleased written work, who gives feedback from the point of view of an average reader to the author. A beta reader provides advice and comments in the opinions of an average reader—feedback given by the writer to fix remaining issues with plot, pacing, and consistency. You can learn more about beta read in my blog post here. I critique partner falls in the same lines, just that they can also be another author or writer. Usually the both of you will read each others work.

2. Proofreaders

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From Canva

They are the most common of editors you’ll find. Proofreaders usually work with the final person to read through before publishing—spelling, punctuation, or grammar mistakes. Some people only use beta readers before sending their work to a proofreader.

3. Developmental Editors

Developmental editors get your story ready for publication. They focus on the tone, plot, audience, and structure of the work. They can also act as ghostwriters for your written work. They are a must-have for anyone trying to write or publish a novel.

4. Copy or Line Editors

Copy editors go by many names; line editors, content editors, etc. I group them all together since the difference between them are little to none. They do everything from checking grammar and formatting. Copy editors specifically study punctuation and grammar, have extensive knowledge of the language, and writing styles.

How many book editors do I need?

So I don’t have a definite number. I would say get as many eyes on your work as you possibly can. But I usually try to stay in the range of 4-8 editors, this in includes beta readers. The more eyes you have on your work, the better off it will be. But be cautious not everyone is working on a timeline. Make sure you keep track of your editors and their progress. Sometimes you may have an editor (usually beta readers) drop your book, for which ever reason. That’s okay, it happens. Don’t take it too personal, and know that this in another reason to have multiple editors reading your work.

informal adult woman using laptop for working with photo project; editor; editing
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

How do I find book editors near me?

Well the thing is, editors, don’t really need to be in your area to be of service to you. Posting listing on freelance sites, like Upwork, can help you find editors in your area, if you plan on meeting in person, or want someone within your country. The internet is the easiest way, but can give you so many options. I’d try reaching out to editors in Facebook groups. Beta readers can be anyone from your neighbor, to your professor, to a fellow writer. Never forget to post on social about you wanting to get editors. Most of my editors are beta readers, then I hire 1-2 professional editors afterwards.

How much does it cost?

stack of books beside a shopping cart with cash money; price for book editing
Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

I think this maybe the most important question. And book editors can range from free to thousands of dollars. And don’t think you need to send $2k to get a good editor. There are tons and tons of affordable editors out there in the world. Know what price range you can work within, and find editors that can provide you services at that price. Thanks for reading. I hope this info will help you and others in the future! And remember:

Live. Laugh. Love.

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    Why Do Writers and Authors Need Beta Readers? | Win's Books
    July 14, 2021 at 10:50 AM

    […] The other two places I use are Facebook and Twitter. For Facebook the best thing is to join groups and ask members if they would be willing to read your work. With Twitter just DM or tweet out (with the right hashtags) that you’re looking for people to read your work in progress (or #WIP). The worst they can say is no. Beta readers are a great and affordable way to gain book editors as well You can read more about the different types of editors here. […]

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